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... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:29 The Consuming Fire George...MacDonald Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. Our God is a consuming fire ....dwell that same consuming fire which is essential love. Let us look at the utterance of the apostle... ...
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... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:29 The Consuming Fire Homilist... ...
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... — George MacDonald Our God is a consuming fire . -- HEBREWS xii.29 Nothing is inexorable...be our life, that in us, too, might dwell that same consuming fire which is essential love. Let us...To love our brother is to worship the Consuming Fire. The symbol of the consuming fire would seem... ...
http://biblehub.com/library/macdonald/unspoken_sermons/the_consuming_fire.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:29 The Consuming Fire L. D....but we are centred within the love of God, and he dares not rush upon that consuming fire within...the obedient, becomes a burning indignation, a ceaseless and consuming fire against the soul that renders... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/bevan/the_consuming_fire.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:29 God a Consuming Fire W.... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/jones/god_a_consuming_fire.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:29 God a Consuming Fire M.... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/meyer/god_a_consuming_fire.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Isaiah 47:14 God's Judgment as Consuming Fire F.... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/delitzsch/god's_judgment_as_consuming_fire.htm
... A. J. Parry. Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. A glass inkstand... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/parry/the_beneficent_becoming_destruction.htm
... . Whiton, D. D. Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. I. THE FACT. It is doubly... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/whiton/the_fire_of_god.htm
... Homilist Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. I. Fire is UNIVERSAL, and God's love is everywhere — the life of all the living, the beauty of...... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/pub/divine_love_is_fire.htm
... . Raikes, M. A. Deuteronomy 4:24 For the LORD your God is a consuming fire, even a jealous God... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/raikes/the_jealousy_of_god.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Hebrews 12:25-29 The Immovableness of the Gospel Dispensation H. Melvill, B. D. Hebrews 12:25-29 See that you refuse not him that speaks. For if they escaped not who refused him that spoke on earth, much more shall not we escape… The gospel dispensation is the "kingdom which cannot be moved." It is described as a "kingdom which cannot be moved," because it is the complete development of God's design towards this earth, and not a mere herald of a fuller manifestation. And when St. Paul appeals to the reception of an immovable kingdom as furnishing a motive to earnestness in the service of God, he is to be considered as arguing from the fixedness of the present dispensation to the duty of a reverential and filial obedience. The object, therefore, of our discourse must be to display the fairness of such reasoning; in other words, to explain how the fact that the kingdom that cannot be moved furnishes a motive to the serving God "acceptably with reverence and with godly fear." I. First, then, upon general grounds. WHY SHOULD THE FIXEDNESS OF THE GOSPEL DISPENSATION URGE US TO DILIGENCE IN THE SERVICE OF GOD? Suppose we take the opposite supposition, and imagine that there had been none of this fixedness in the gospel of Christ. Let us conceive ourselves placed under an imperfect and temporal economy, and see what difference would be made in our moral position. If you could throw an air of doubtfulness around the completion of revelation — if rather you could prove that there was still a portion of God's will to be made known; that we are not in possession of all that knowledge in respect of redemption which shall be communicated to man on this side of eternity, then immediately there would be engendered a feeling of restlessness and uncertainty; our minds, in place of setting themselves earnestly to the study of what was given, would waste themselves in conjecturing what was withheld. It is evident that under the Jewish dispensation there was a vast deal of this moral dissatisfaction. An absolute sickness of heart appears to have been felt by the most upright and pious at the long delay of a fuller revelation. There is just the difference between our condition under an immovable kingdom, and the condition of those who were under the movable kingdom, that there would be between a man who should be bidden to do something in the dark, and that of another man who should be told to do the same thing in the daylight. We will not say that the darkness is an apology for remissness, but that the sunshine takes away a great show of excuse. Receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, there are not brought to bear on us the disturbing forces which acted within the moral orbit of the Jew. We look straightway to Christ as a sacrifice, and are not set to behold Him in bulls and goats led up to the brazen altar. We can mark the Mediator, entering by His own blood into the holy of holies, and are not left to search out His intercession in that of a priest who, compassed with infirmity, needed for himself what he presented for others. We can go at once to "the fountain open for sin and uncleanness," and are not required to learn the methods of spiritual purification from the multiplied processes of ceremonial. We have been made acquainted with the abolition of death, of life and immortality being brought vividly to light, and we are not reduced to a vague hope or dim conjecture of the resurrection of matter and of its fresh inhabitation by spirit. But in these and numerous like points of distinction lies the difference between a kingdom which can be moved and a kingdom which cannot be moved. That which cannot be moved is the substance, whilst that which can be moved is only the shadow. He, therefore, who is under the immovable, has realities within his grasp, whilst he who is under the movable has only figure and parable; and just in proportion that the knowing with precision what is to be hoped and what feared will make a man more decisive in action than the being left in doubt and uncertainty — in that same proportion ought energy under the immovable dispensation to carry it over energy under the movable dispensation. The statutes of this kingdom are not written in hieroglyphics; the laws of its citizenship are not propounded in enigmas; everything wears the aspect of a final and complete revelation; the figurative has given place to the literal: prophecy has sunk into performance; who, therefore, will refuse to acknowledge that there is laid upon those who receive the immovable kingdom a mighty weight of responsibleness over and above that which rested on the recipients of the movable? And if the fixedness of the dispensation thus enhance the responsibleness of its subjects, we put beyond controversy that the fixedness should furnish motives to the serving God " acceptably with reverence and godly fear." II. Now we propose, in the second place, to make good the same truth on the particular ground which the apostle lays down. St. Paul argues the duty of obedience from the fixedness of the dispensation; BUT THEN HE SUBJOINS AS HIS CONCLUDING ARGUMENT — "For our God is a consuming fire." Let us see how the several arguments are associated. We cannot be wrong in arguing that until the gospel was published — until, that is, the spiritual kingdom was finally settled on an immovable basis, there were points on which God's will was not clearly ascertained, and men might easily have formed incorrect suppositions, forasmuch as they proceeded on an imperfect knowledge. Informed of God's gracious design of providing pardon for the guilty, but not informed of the details of the arrangement, it might well come to pass that they would indulge in expectations which a fuller intelligence would have caused them to reject. They knew that God was "a consuming fire"; but they derived this knowledge from that tremendous outbreak of thunder and flame which accompanied the delivery of the law. But you will, we think, allow that if the Israelites knew God as "a consuming fire," because so revealed on Mount Sinai, and if they did not as yet know thoroughly the character under which lie would reveal Himself on Mount Zion, it might be a matter of question with them whether the mildness of the one revelation would not so temper the fierceness of the other, that "a consuming fire" might no longer be a just description of God. They lived under a movable dispensation; the immovable which was to follow, came charged with discoveries of God's purposes of lovingkindness; might there not consequently have been somewhat of hesitation on their minds as to whether the tire which blazed awfully before mercy was allowed to shine out in its brightness, would be equally devouring when the day of free pardon had dawned on the creation? But so soon as the kingdom became "a kingdom which cannot be moved"; the possible union of characters — the characters of the punishing God and the pardoning God — was established beyond the reach of a question or a doubt. We cannot, unless we hoodwink our understandings, and take pains to be the victims of a lie, flatter ourselves that judgment when brought out into action will be less fiery and less tremendous than when graven on the statute book. Ours is the immovable kingdom, and the very process by which this kingdom was set up and wrought into steadfastness witnesses with a testimony the most thrilling, that it was a law with God, the least swerving from which would be the shaking of His own throne, that sin must be punished before the sinner can be pardoned. It was on Zion ten thousandfold more than on Sinai, that the Almighty proved Himself "a consuming fire." When the eternal Son in the might of the coalition of Deity and humanity went up the mountain side and laid Himself down on the altar, the substitute of a lost world, and there blazed forth the fires of justice to consume the sacrifice. Oh t then, far beyond the demonstration of Sinai, wrapped in flame and smoke, was there given a proof to all intelligent creation, that the emblem of God, when He deals with the guilty, shall be ever that of "a consuming fire." Thus it was in giving fixedness to the dispensation that God manifested Himself as "a consuming fire." The fact that the kingdom cannot be moved is an irresistible proof that the fire cannot be extinguished. Thus there is a connection, the very closest between the fixedness of the gospel dispensation and that character of God which sets Him forth as the devourer of the impenitent; and hence we gather that the argument to the "serving God acceptably," which is drawn from His being "a consuming fire," is but a particular case of the general argument derived from our "receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved." Therefore, all our former reasons on the general argument must be applicable to the particular. Futurity comes charged with no softenings away of God's wrath against sin; this is the fact that should nerve to obedience. We ought, perhaps, to say a word on the somewhat singular expression — "Let us have grace." It can only refer to our seeking grace, to our improving grace. Without grace is it impossible that we should serve God acceptably, for man himself is void of all capacity for performing the will of his Maker; hence the being admonished that we may have grace to serve God acceptably is the same thing as being admonished that we set not to the work in any strength of our own, but that we go to God for assistance in order that we may honour God by obedience. And we may further observe that the service here demanded at our hands is of a nature which marks the awfulness of God. There is to be nothing of familiarity, there is to be nothing of forgetfulness of the unmeasured distance which, even when brought nigh by the blood of His own Son, separates between God and ourselves. Therefore we are to serve "with reverence and godly fear"; and though undoubtedly the fear which a Christian entertains towards God will be filial fear rather than slavish, the fear of a son who loves rather than that of a servant who dreads, yet it is certain that in our text an apprehension of wrath is supposed to be an element of godly fear. "Such would have been my lot," will the Christian say, when musing on the fate of the impenitent, "had not free grace interposed, and God of His rich lovingkindness brought me up from destruction." Carry away with you, then, this truth — the truth that peculiar interest in God is no encouragement to the throwing aside the most awful fear of God. "Our God is a consuming fire." How rich the summit of privilege when you can say, "O God, Thou art my God! " And yet when the summit is reached you must still look to the blazing, burning Deity for "our God," my God, "is a consuming fire." "At first glance," says an old prelate, "these two expressions, 'our God,' and 'a consuming fire,' seem to look strangely at one another, but the Holy Ghost hath excellently tempered them." He is our God — this corrects that despairing fear which would otherwise seize on us from the consideration of God as "a consuming fire." But then, He is not only "our God"; He is also "a consuming fire" — this corrects that presumptuous irreverence to which else we might be emboldened by the consideration of our interest in God as "our God." ( H. Melvill, B. D. ) Parallel Verses KJV: See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more shall not we escape , if we turn away from him that speaketh from heaven: WEB: See that you don't refuse him who speaks. For if they didn't escape when they refused him who warned on the Earth, how much more will we not escape who turn away from him who warns from heaven,... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/melvill/the_immovableness_of_the_gospel_dispensation.htm
... , D. D. Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. As regards the use of fire... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/kellogg/god_as_fire.htm
... James Owen. Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. I am thankful that men do... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/owen/lightning_as_well_as_light.htm
... . Saurin. Hebrews 12:29 For our God is a consuming fire. I. WE WILL ENDEAVOUR TO GIVE YOU... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/saurin/the_severity_of_god.htm
... Hymns and Spiritual Songs — Isaac Watts 1 Adore and tremble, for our God Is a consuming fire ;*... ...
http://biblehub.com/library/watts/hymns_and_spiritual_songs/hymn_1_42_divine_wrath_and.htm
... Title Page UNSPOKEN SERMONS FIRST SERIES THE CHILD IN THE MIDST. THE CONSUMING FIRE. THE... ...
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... Prayer!" -- Ps. lxv.2. Thou, God, art a consuming fire...... ...
http://biblehub.com/library/montgomery/sacred_poems_and_hymns/hymn_lxviii_o_thou_that.htm
... Bible > Sermons > Numbers 11:1-3 The Worst Fire W. Seaton. Numbers 11:1-3 And when the people complained, it displeased the LORD: and the LORD heard it; and his anger was kindled… Nothing but mercies had come upon the back of their complainings before. They had had water, and they had had bread; but now the Lord would send them fire. It should be the fire of the Lord, holy fire; yet not as that, which, descending from heaven upon the altar, burnt continually before the Lord in His temple, acceptable in sacrifice; but a consuming fire; the burning of His wrath. It is bad to "be saved so as by fire," to have all consumed, but ourselves, to be burnt out of house and home; yet far worse is it to be burnt out of the world. Still this might be the way to heaven for some, carried thither as in a chariot of fire. We know it was the way, the common way that martyrs went. The fire was kindled by their enemies; but it was not as the burning of Taberah; there was no ingredient of the wrath of the Almighty in the flame: but "one like unto the Son of Man" was there, to make it as the purest vestment of the soul, the involving element of love. Oh, there is a fire worse than all others, the burning of the Lord, a fire that descends to the bottomless pit, and the smoke of which has been seen. Behold it kindling in the camp of Israel. It had indignation in it; it was a consuming fire, lighted up in the righteous displeasure of heaven, its fuel the bodies of transgressors themselves. "Tile people complained." What then? "It displeased the Lord; and His anger was kindled; and the fire of the Lord burnt among them, and consumed them in the uttermost parts of the camp." There was no flying from it, it was a city in flames from its utmost extremities. Who can run from the presence of the Lord? How affecting this? It may be conceived, kindled by lightning from the cloud that had guided them, darting in angry form, and with the voice of the Almighty, in thunders impatient to be gone. Who can stand before the indignation of the Lord? who can abide His anger when the gathering storm of His displeasure breaks forth? His favour, what man that regards his life would not entreat? His wrath, what man that fears His power would not deprecate? He is to us, as what we are to Him — sinners or saints. This judgment had in it everything awful — cut off from all share in the promises, slain by the power that had kept them alive, and left heaps of wrath in the very way to life. ( W. Seaton. ) Parallel Verses KJV: And when the people complained, it displeased the LORD: and the LORD heard it ; and his anger was kindled; and the fire of the LORD burnt among them, and consumed them that were in the uttermost parts of the camp. WEB: The people were complaining in the ears of Yahweh. When Yahweh heard it, his anger was kindled; and Yahweh's fire burnt among them, and consumed some of the outskirts of the camp.... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/seaton/the_worst_fire.htm
... for it shows us how great our sins and how holy our God. We see God as a consuming fire to consume... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/brown/the_miraculous_fire.htm
... who stands between us and the consuming fire of outraged law, and in virtue of His interposition... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/watkinson/beneficent_interposition.htm
... with one who is a consuming fire ( Hebrews 12:29 ). ( Thomas Brooks. . ) Parallel Verses KJV: And... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/brookes/murmuring_hurts_not_god_but_wounds_us.htm
... GOD WAS PLEASED TO MANIFEST HIMSELF AS CONSUMING FIRE UPON HIS ALTAR. What God gave was additional...all the people saw it, they shouted, and fell on their faces." God is a consuming fire in the way...most ardently to serve him. May none of us experience the consuming fire of the Divine wrath,... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/edgar/a_sign_expected_and_received.htm
... Bible > Sermons > 2 Corinthians 2:14-16 The Minister's Manifesto A. J. Parry. 2 Corinthians 2:14-16 Now thanks be to God, which always causes us to triumph in Christ, and makes manifest the aroma of his knowledge by us in every place.… I. THE MINISTRY IN ITS RELATION TO GOD. 1. It is "of God." (1)  As having been instituted by Him. (2)  Because He called men specially to occupy it. 2. It is under the special inspection of God. "In the sight of God speak we in Christ," Feeling this, Paul was particularly careful — (1) Not to corrupt or adulterate the Word of God, to "make merchandise" of it — i.e. , to make it more marketable by a little politic admixture of things more to the taste of the people. (2) To be himself actuated in his work by the purest motives. "But as of sincerity." This sincerity applies to the preacher just as the incorruptibility applies to the gospel. Here, then, we have a pure preacher and a pure gospel. 3. It will be approved of God, whatever be its effects upon men (ver. 15). "Sweet savour" always indicates approval. This is the expression generally used to denote the acceptableness of an offering. II. THE DIFFERENT EFFECTS OF THIS MINISTRY UPON MEN (ver. 16). 1. To the saved — life. The savour of life means that which produces life and nurtures it. 2. To the lost or perishing — death ( 2 Corinthians 4:3 ; 1 Peter 3:7, 8 ). There are certain conditions pertaining to certain men which convert the means of life into an instrument of death. The sun, which converts the generous soil into a fruitful garden, reduces the clay to the hardness of a stone. So is it morally, only with a great difference. The clay is not responsible, but men are responsible. One thing, then, is clear — no one will escape Without some effects from the ministry. What is there more beautiful than the sunbeams? Yet there are some objects which can convert them into a consuming fire. So there are moral characters which transform the loving, life-giving gospel into an instrument of destruction; in short, cause the God of love to become to them a consuming fire. III. THE DEMAND OF THE MINISTRY UPON THE MINISTER. 1. The unspeakably solemn character of the results of the ministry demands the gravest and most prayerful thought, and the greatest anxiety for the salvation of souls. Note, for example, the surgeon when performing some critical surgical operation that might be for life or death to the patient. So careful and deeply anxious is he that he will not operate except in association with others. The preaching of the gospel is an inexpressibly solemn operation that may affect men for weal or for woe to eternity. And, knowing this, how natural to ask, "Who is sufficient for these things?" 2. But this sense of insufficiency ought not to be confounded with helplessness; on the contrary, it makes a minister all the more strenuous and unsparing in applying his entire energies to the work ( Colossians 1:29 ). IV. THE MINISTRY'S ENCOURAGEMENTS AND SOURCE OF CONFIDENCE. (ver. 14). Whatever be the difficulties of the work, however great our fears and deep our sense of insufficiency, over against them we have God assuring us the victory. Through God the gospel is always having the victory. Much as it has been opposed and persecuted, yet God has always caused it to triumph. ( A. J. Parry. ) Parallel Verses KJV: Now thanks be unto God, which always causeth us to triumph in Christ, and maketh manifest the savour of his knowledge by us in every place. WEB: Now thanks be to God, who always leads us in triumph in Christ, and reveals through us the sweet aroma of his knowledge in every place.... ...
http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/parry/the_minister's_manifesto.htm
... Bible > Library July the Second Light and Lightning My Daily Meditation for the Circling Year — John Henry Jowett " And the spirit of the Lord shall rest upon Him. " -- ISAIAH xi.1-10. And the spirit is one of light! All the doors and windows are open. His correspondences are perfect and unbroken. He is of "quick understanding," keen-scented to discern the essences of things, alert to perceive the reality behind the semblance, to "see things as they are." All the great primary senses are awake, and He has knowledge of every "secret place." " He shall smite ... with the rod of His mouth, and with the breath of His lips shall He slay. " The spirit of light follows a crusade of holiness. The light becomes lightning! The "breathing," which cools the fever-stricken, can also become a hot breath, which wastes and destroys every plant of evil desire. It is an awful thing, and yet a gracious thing, that "our God is a consuming fire." It was foretold of our Lord that He should baptize "with fire." And this crusade of holiness is in the ministry of peace. He will burn away all that defileth, in order that He may create a profound and permanent fellowship. When His work is done, there will be a mingling of apparent opposites, and antagonisms will melt into a gracious union. "The sucking child will play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the adder's den." Scripture Reference... ...
http://biblehub.com/library/jowett/my_daily_meditation_for_the_circling_year/july_the_second_light_and.htm


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